Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th International Conference on Genomics and Molecular Biology Barcelona, Spain.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Genomics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Reiko Kuroda photo
Biography:

Reiko Kuroda obtained her PhD in Chemistry from the University of Tokyo, and carried out her Post-doctoral studies at King’s College London. Her research focuses on chirality, both in the fi eld of Chemistry and Biology: chirality recognition, transfer and amplifi cation in the solid state, development of chiroptical spectroscophotometers to enable condensed-phase measurements, and the molecular basis of snail body handedness. She has published 328 peer-reviewed papers.

Abstract:

Body handedness of gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis is determined by a single gene locus that functions maternally. We have previously shown that the gene dictates the cytoskeletal dynamics at the third cleavage (from the fourth to the eight-cell stage), and only the embryos of dominant chirality exhibit SD (spiral deformation) and SI (spindle inclination) at this stage. Further, we could create fertile snails of mirror-image body plan by altering the chirality of blastomeres through mechanical manipulation at this stage. In this talk, the identifi cation of the handedness-determining gene will be discussed. Using pure dextral (DD) and sinistral (dd) strains as well as its F2 through to F10 backcrossed lines, the single handedness determining-gene locus was mapped by genetic linkage analysis, BAC cloning and chromosome walking. We have identifi ed the actin related diaphanous gene Lsdia1 as the candidate. Th ere are tandemly-repeated highly-homologus genes, Lsdia1 and Lsdia2. Although the cDNA and derived amino acid sequences of the genes are very similar, we could discriminate the two genes/proteins in our molecular biology experiments. Th e Lsdia1 gene of the sinistral strain carries a single point mutation which causes a frameshift mutation abrogating full-length LsDia1 protein expression. In the dextral strain, it is already translated prior to oviposition. Expression of Lsdia1 (only in the dextral strain) and Lsdia2 (in both chirality) decreases aft er the 1-cell stage, with no asymmetric localization throughout.

Conference Series Genomics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Laila Alves Nahum photo
Biography:

Laila Alves Nahum completed her PhD at the University of São Paulo, Brazil and Postdoctoral studies from the Marine Biological Laboratory and Louisiana State University, USA. She is a Researcher at Fiocruz Minas and a Teacher at Promove College of Technology. Her research is focused on the Phylogenomics (Phylogenetics + Genomics) of a broad range of organisms including human pathogens and their vectors. She has published research papers in reputed journals and book chapters.

Abstract:

The availability of genomic data provides an opportunity to understand parasite biology and to identify new drug candidates against neglected diseases aff ecting millions of people worldwide. Functional annotation of genomes, transcriptomes and predicted proteomes is one of the major challenges in sequencing projects. We address this challenge by applying an evolutionary framework to the interpretation of sequence data. Our research projects have been focused on the analyses of distinct protein families in helminths (Schistosoma and others) and protozoans (Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Plasmodium), which cause a broad range of diseases. Th ese protein families include mainly protein kinases, protein deacetylases, and proteases. Potential homologues in the predicted proteomes of selected taxa are identifi ed by using hidden Markov model profi les. Evolutionary relationships of protein sequences are reconstructed by two character-based methods (Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood). Evolutionary trees are annotated with taxonomic and experimental information based on the scientifi c literature. Our work improves functional annotation of genes and proteins of diverse parasites and their homologues in humans. Furthermore, our work potentially identifi es molecular biomarkers with various applications.

Keynote Forum

Runsheng Chen

Institute of Biophysics - CAS, China

Keynote: Big data in noncoding RNA and precision medicine
Conference Series Genomics 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Runsheng Chen photo
Biography:

Runsheng Chen is a Principal Investigator at Institute of Biophysics CAS. He is an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), and an academician of the International Eurasian Academy of Sciences. He is a member of Human Genome Organization (HUGO), a member of the bio-macromolecule group of Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA), and a member of the bioinformatics professional committee of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). He is now the General Secretary and Vice President of Chinese Society of Biophysics, and has published more than 130 papers in SCI.

Abstract:

The living organisms on the earth, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, have been proliferating for billions of years. To date, they form in more complicated structure, and function in more perfect ways. However, what really determined the complex phenotype, structure and function of living organisms? Where do they store those huge amounts of information? And how do they operate? All of these have been keen questions for people to explore. What has been astonishing, and puzzle is the fact that life is not just a simple group of molecules; instead, it is highly organized. Th ere are connections between nucleus and cytoplasm, a clearly work division between diff erent organizations, and synergy cooperation within organs. Th erefore, a normal living organism is extremely orderly, multi-level, and dynamic. Th e complexity of the organism is not only refl ected in the complexity of the structure of DNA information, but also on the implementation of the information and operation rule. Th is report mainly introduces the rise of noncoding area and great innovation opportunity it off ers, and the role of big data in this fi eld. Meanwhile, this report also introduces what the scientists have explored for the associations between genotype and phenotype. As a result, series of new concepts, such as translational medicine, personalized medicine; precision medicine, etc. have been put forward by medical scientists. All of these
imply that the big changes for medical system, from diagnosis, treatment to health care, are upcoming. It also suggests the birth of a
new generation of huge health care industry.

  • Genomics | Next Generation Sequencing | Cancer Biology | Bio-Engineering | Biomarkers Structural Biology | Integrative Biology
Location: Orly

Chair

Laila Alves Nahum

René Rachou Institute, Brazil

Co-Chair

Mamoru Shoji

Emory University School of Medicine, USA

Biography:

Nehir Ozdemır Ozgenturk completed her Graduation at Ege University; Master's degree in Plant Breeding department and; PhD in Department of Justus Liebieg University.
In 2003, she worked at Cereal Research Center in Canada as a Post doc. Also she worked at Georgia Medical School for four months with Nato fellowship. She has
scientifi c paper in various scientifi c journals, publications and presentations at international conferences.

Abstract:

RNA-seq technology was performed by using a comparative transcriptome analysis of the MMTV-TGF-α female mice thymus tissues that were fed ad libitum (AL), chronic calorie restriction (CCR) (85% of AL fed mice) and intermittent calorie restriction (ICR) (3 weeks AL fed, 1 week 40% of AL fed mice) from 10 weeks of age to 17 weeks of age or 18 weeks of age. Th e results of RNA-seq analysis, a total of 6091 signifi cantly diff erentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identifi ed. 2821, 2825 and 445 signifi cantly DEGs were detected between AL-CCR, CCR-ICR and AL-ICR fed groups, respectively. Th ese DEGs were classifi ed according to cellular components, biological processes and molecular functions Gene Ontology (GO) main categories. 188 of 2821, 36 of 445, 176 of 2825 genes were identifi ed to be involved in immune system process (GO:0002376) biological processes GO categories. KEGG pathway and the gene co-expression network analysis between AL-CCR, CCRICR and AL-ICR fed groups immune-related DEGs were done using String database. For network analysis, nodes and edges
presented the interaction between immune-related DEGs.

Biography:

Mamoru Shojiobtained his Medical Degree from the Hokkaido University, Japan, and completed internships at the US Naval Hospital, Yokosuka, Japan and the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He did his residency in Internal Medicine at the Lahey Clinic, Boston and fellowship training in Immunology at the Peter Bent Brigham and Robert Breck Brigham Hospitals (mentor, John R David, MD), Harvard Medical School in Boston, in Tumor Immunology at the University of Minnesota (mentor, Charles F Mckhann, MD from Massachusetts General Hospital) in Minneapolis, followed by fellowship in Hematology and Medical Oncology at Emory University (mentor, Charles M Huguley, Jr., MD).

Abstract:

Therapy of breast cancer metastasis with UBS109:An estimated 30% of women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer will have a recurrence and may eventually die of their disease. An estimated 90% of deaths due to breast cancer area consequence of metastatic disease. Bone is one of the most common sites (70%) of metastasis.Monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin (MACs) include UBS109, EF31 and EF24. UBS109 inhibited bone destruction induced by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) MDA-MB-231 cells. UBS109 directly stimulates osteoblastogenesis and mineralization in bone marrow cells from normal nude mice in vitro and stimulates osteoblast activation in preosteoblastic cells. Furthermore,UBS109 suppresses the diff erentiation of osteoclast precursors into mature osteoclasts. UBS109 inhibited breast cancer in the bone, osteolysis by inhibiting osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, but promotes new bone formation by stimulating osteoblast activation. Recently, we have demonstrated that UBS109 inhibited lung metastasis of the TNBC. Novel therapy for pancreaticand colon cancer using UBS109: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death, the
overall 5-year survival for PDA is less than 5%, a median survival of 4–6 months. Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a high incidence of clotting complications. We tested the cytotoxic activity of UBS109, EF31, EF24, HSP90 inhibitor, gemcitabine (current treatment), Akt inhibitor and p38 MAPK inhibitor against four diff erent PC cells.UBS109 and EF24 inhibited 100% at less than 1.25 μM, but others did not inhibit 100% at concentrations up to 20 μM. UBS109 and EF31(25 mg/kg, I.V.)/week for 3 weeks signifi cantly inhibited MiaPaCa-2 xenograft s in mice.UBS109 (25 mg/kg, I.V.)/week inhibited colon cancer (HT-29 and HCT- 116) xenograft s better than a combination of oxaliplatin (5 mg/kg) and 5FU (30 mg/kg) I.V.

Biography:

Marta Koblowska is currently the Director of the Laboratory of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology at the Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw. Since 2008, she is the Head of the Laboratory of Microarray Analysis, in the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences. Her main research interests focus around chromatin function in regulating gene expression changes in plant adaptation to stress conditions. Her group recently showed that plant specifi c histone deacetylase HD2C interacts with BRM-containing SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and both are involved in mediating the heat stress response in Arabidopsis.

Abstract:

One of the major abiotic constrains aff ecting plant growth is soil salinity. Despite many years of studying the molecular basis of plant response to high salinity, we still have gaps in our understanding of complex mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to salinity. To advance our knowledge about the early stages of plant cell response to salinity, we carried out a timeseries experiment during the fi rst 100 minutes of high-salt stress. As the most suitable model for performed studies, we chose Arabidopsis T87 cell line, off ering a relative cellular homogeneity comparing to a mixture of cells building the whole seedling or their organs. Our previous results describing nucleosomal response to high salinity, cold and abscisic acid (ABA) showed that Arabidopsis T87 cell line is a very convenient model to analyze stress response at the cellular level. To establish if frequent passages had an impact on T87 cells genome, we characterized a genetic variation in T87 cells. Apart from our previous data demonstrating that phosphorylation of histone H3 (H3S10ph) is a nucleosomal marker of cells standard behavior under stress, we also showed a novel histone modifi cation, H4K16ac to be a valid epigenetic signature of plant stress response. Transcription profi ling of T87 cells led to identifi cation of previously unrecognized genes, strongly activated during fi rst few minutes of salinity stress. Time-series transcriptome analysis during salinity stress followed by Bayesian network modelling recognized a set of hub genes directing the early response of plant cells to salinity stress.

Biography:

Marta Koblowska is currently the Director of the Laboratory of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology at the Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw. Since 2008, she is the Head of the Laboratory of Microarray Analysis, in the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences. Her main research interests focus around chromatin function in regulating gene expression changes in plant adaptation to stress conditions. Her group recently showed that plant specifi c histone deacetylase HD2C interacts with BRM-containing SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and both are involved in mediating the heat stress response in Arabidopsis.

Abstract:

One of the major abiotic constrains aff ecting plant growth is soil salinity. Despite many years of studying the molecular basis of plant response to high salinity, we still have gaps in our understanding of complex mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to salinity. To advance our knowledge about the early stages of plant cell response to salinity, we carried out a timeseries experiment during the fi rst 100 minutes of high-salt stress. As the most suitable model for performed studies, we chose Arabidopsis T87 cell line, off ering a relative cellular homogeneity comparing to a mixture of cells building the whole seedling or their organs. Our previous results describing nucleosomal response to high salinity, cold and abscisic acid (ABA) showed that Arabidopsis T87 cell line is a very convenient model to analyze stress response at the cellular level. To establish if frequent passages had an impact on T87 cells genome, we characterized a genetic variation in T87 cells. Apart from our previous data demonstrating that phosphorylation of histone H3 (H3S10ph) is a nucleosomal marker of cells standard behavior under stress, we also showed a novel histone modifi cation, H4K16ac to be a valid epigenetic signature of plant stress response. Transcription profi ling of T87 cells led to identifi cation of previously unrecognized genes, strongly activated during fi rst few minutes of salinity stress. Time-series transcriptome analysis during salinity stress followed by Bayesian network modelling recognized a set of hub genes directing the early response of plant cells to salinity stress.

Biography:

Michael Bergel is currently an Associate Professor at Texas Woman’s University (TWU), the largest university primarily for women in the United States. His lab has recently submitted a provisional patent application: U S Provisional Patent Application No. 62/567,089 entitled “Use of histone acetyltransferase inhibitor amidoximes as anti-proliferative agents”, fi led October 2, 2017. During his Postdoctoral training at the NIH, NCI with Dr. M Bustin, he specialized in the fi eld of chromatin. Specifi cally, he studied the HMGN1/2 proteins and their acetylation by the histone acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF. He also demonstrated that HMGNs are involved in regulation of core histone posttranslational modifi cations. He obtained his Master’s and PhD from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in the fi eld of Cancer Biology, mentored by Dr. Jacob Hochman. His research interest includes chromatin, cancer biology, DNA repair and cellular UV response.

Abstract:

Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) and linker histone H1 are involved in both chromatin compaction and the regulation of mitotic progression. However, the mechanisms by which HDAC3 and H1 regulate mitosis as well as the factors controlling HDAC3 and H1 activity during mitosis are unclear. Furthermore, as of now, no other association between class I, II or IV HDACs and linker histones has been reported. Here, we describe a novel HDAC3-H1.3 complex containing SMRT and N-CoR and at least four other proteins which accumulated in synchronized HeLa cells in late G2 and mitosis. Nonetheless, the deacetylation activity by the HDAC3 in the complex was evident only in mitotic complexes. HDAC3 associated to H1.3 was highly phosphorylated on S424 only during mitosis. Isolation of inactive HDAC3-H1.3 complexes from late-G2 cells and phosphorylation of HDAC3 in the complexes at serine 424 by protein kinase CK2 (also known as casein kinase 2), activated the HDAC3 in vitro. In vivo, CK2a and CK2a’ double knockdown cells demonstrated a signifi cant decrease in HDAC3 S424 phosphorylation during mitosis. HDAC3 and H1.3 co-localized in between the chromosomes with polar microtubules and spindle poles during metaphase through telophase and partially co-localized with chromatin during prophase and interphase. H1 was previously reported to associate with microtubules; thus, it could potentially function in targeting HDAC3 to the microtubules. We recently demonstrated that HDAC3, H1.3 or double knockdown cells have a lower microtubule polymerization rate in mitotic cells, thus supporting the role of the activated HDAC3-H1.3 complex in regulating mitotic microtubule growth.

Witold Chmielewski

Dentistry of Laval University, Canada

Title: Engineering human oral mucosa for clinical application
Biography:

Witold Chmielewski is a Professor at the Faculty of Dentistry of Laval University. He is a Clinician and Researcher in the fi eld of Dentistry, Buccal Physiology and
Biomaterials. He got his MSc from Montreal and Doctorate in Dentistry from University of Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. He has more than 20 peer reviewed scientifi c publications and has authored numerous communications at scientifi c conferences and congresses.

Abstract:

Soft tissues such as skin and oral mucosa defi cits are usually corrected with autologous tissue collected from diff erent donor sites. Considered as the gold standard in damaged tissue reconstruction, this procedure is hampered by signifi cant limitations that include the limited amount of tissue to be collected, the creation of new fragile sites and the possible inappropriate healing of those donor sites. To overcome these limitations, some clinical initiatives have shown the possible use of engineered soft tissues such as oral mucosa for tissue reconstruction. Th us, our primary goal was to optimize the needed conditions for engineering clinically useful gingival human tissue. To reach our goal, we used primary human epithelial cells and fi broblasts that have been isolated from small gingival biopsies. Cells were propagated and then used to engineer human oral mucosa using a collagen scaff old. Before graft ing, tissue structure and protein production were investigated using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Th e in vivo studies were performed by graft ing the engineered tissue onto the dorsa of immunodefi cient mice. Aft er 15 and 60 days post graft ing, biopsies were collected and used to evaluate the structure of the newly generated mucosa. Interestingly, our data demonstrated that isolated gingival cells were able to adhere and proliferate when seeded into collagen scaff old. Epithelial cells gave a well-structured and stratifi ed epithelium, basically being cultured into a connective tissue (collagen matrix populated with gingival fi broblasts). Following graft ing, the engineered human oral mucosa was able to generate mucosa that covers all available graft ing surfaces. Th e tissue contained a well-vascularised lamina propria and well-structured epithelium. Both structures communicate through a basement membrane containing lamini-5 and type IV collagen. All together, the results demonstrate the usefulness of engineered oral mucosa tissue as an alternative to replace damaged gingiva.

Biography:

A I Archakov is a Full Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Professor & Scientifi c Advisor at Institute of Biomedical Chemistry. He has organized scientifi c school to study molecular organization and functioning of oxygenase cytochrome P450-containing systems, molecular mechanisms of the structure and function of membranes and biological oxidation. He has guided the institute’s members in developing a fundamentally new pharmaceutical composition “Phosphogliv” with antiviral activity for the treatment of liver diseases of various etiology. He is the pioneer in the development of proteomics in Russia. Currently, he is the International “Human Proteome” Project Coordinator in Russia. He is one of the Russia’s top 100 scientists with Hirsch number 27. He is the author of more than 700 scientifi c works including about 482 scientifi c articles, 6 monographs, 30 patents and author’s certifi cates. He was Scientifi c Advisor for 15 Doctors’ and more than 60 PhD theses. He is the winner of three state prizes of the USSR, the RSFSR and of the Russian Federation.

Abstract:

The researchers working with high-throughput methods of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics reconsider the concept of concentration and evaluate the data obtained in the number of copies of biomacromolecules. Measurement of copy number refl ects a steady trend in increasing the sensitivity of postgenomic analytical methods, up to the level of a single molecule. In this paper we review the physical meaning of the terms molar concentration and Avogadro’s number to establish a relationship between them. Th e relationship between the molar concentration and the number of copies of
that same macromolecule in a certain volume is set through the reverse Avogadro’s number, the value of which (≈10-24 М) characterizes the molar concentration of a single molecule in 1 liter. Using the reverse Avogadro’s number, we deal with situations in analyzing homogeneous biological solutions and heterogeneous cellular material.

Biography:

Alex Chenchik is the President and Scientifi c Director of Cellecta Inc., Mountain View, California, USA. His work focuses on “Development and application of next generation functional genomic technologies for discovery biomarkers, drug targets and development novel drugs”. He worked for Systems Biosciences, LLC as Vice- President of R/D and developed genetic screen technology with pooled lentiviral shRNA libraries in combination with a wide range of reporter cell lines. He also worked for BDB Clontech as Director of GCA Department and participated in the development of microarrays and disease-profi ling arrays for expression profi ling, PCR-based technologies for gene cloning, and subtraction-based approach for discovery of differentially expressed genes. He has done PhD in Molecular Biology (1982) from Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow, Russia. He did MS in Chemistry (1978) at Institute of Fine Chemical Technology, Moscow, Russia.

Abstract:

New rapid and robust transcriptome-based methods for cellular characterization of the tumor microenvironment and biomarker discovery are required to improve prognosis and treatment of cancer and other diseases. However, challenges with current approaches for the above applications include high sample requirements, poor sensitivity, low dynamic range, and limited throughput. To address these limitations, we have developed the DriverMap™ targeted RNA expression profi ling assay using a genome-wide set of 19,000 validated primer pairs that leverages the sensitivity of multiplex RT-PCR with the throughput and digital readout depth of next-generation sequencing (NGS). Starting from just 10pg (single-cell) to 100ng (10,000 cells)
of total RNA is suffi cient to quantify over 5 orders of magnitude variation in gene expression levels with performance similar to conventional qRT-PCR. Further, the use of gene-specifi c primers enables direct analysis of total RNA isolate and obviates the need for globin and rRNA depletion from whole blood samples. And, using a subset of primers empirically selected from the DriverMap™ assay, we have developed a novel single-cell targeted RNA expression (scTRex) profi ling assay compatible with conventional oligo dT-molecular indexing, single- cell barcoding strategies. In this study, we present the performance of the assay to analyze the level of immune cell infi ltration in tumor samples, and identify active pathways in tumor, xenograft samples and cell lines treated with small molecules. Preliminary studies demonstrate the assay’s unparalleled specifi city and sensitivity resulting in better detection of low abundance mRNA transcripts as well as an improved cost-eff ectiveness for highthroughput clinical applications.

Biography:

Arieh Zaritsky obtained a distinguished MSc in Genetics at the Hebrew University, Israel in 1967. He completed his PhD from Leicester University, UK in 1971 and Post-doctorate at University Institute of Microbiology, Copenhagen, Denmark in 1972. During his career, he has instructed over 50 graduate students/scientists and was awarded numerous research grants. He visited higher education institutions around the world and delivered invited lectures at international meetings. He is a recognized expert in Bacterial and Bacteriophage Physiology, on which he has published about half of his 130 peer-reviewed articles, and was awarded (1994) Burroughs-Wellcome/ ASM Visiting Professorship.

Abstract:

Dependence of virulent (bacterio) phage multiplication on the physiological state of its host, conceived in the 1940’s,was refi nedfor the T4/Escherichia coli model system.Th e knownkinetic parameters (adsorption rate, eclipse and latent periods, ripening-rate, and consequent burst size) are relatedsolely to the host’s physiological state expressed by the bacterial growth rate before infection.Numerical models were advanced to explain (a)dependence of phage multiplication dynamics on host’s physiology, (b) co-existence of phage and its susceptible bacteria based on phage suicideand (c) kinetics of cell lysis based on materials corrosion, statistics of extremes and updated knowledge on bacterial physiology and phage biology. A mathematical model (d) was devisedto maximize phage titers by adjusting values of bacterial doubling time and initial multiplicity of infection (MOI). Results display a range of possible values along a golden strip in the relevant plane, and times to achieve these maxima and gains were evaluated.Resolution of the adsorption kinetics was refi ned (e) by frequent (~5 min-1) sampling at MOI=1 during the fi rst 6 min. Th e observed fast drop in free phage and bacteria is consistent with a relatively simple model. Th e sharper reduction in viable cells indicates that adsorption is more complex than thought to be.Th e consistencies of the various models with existing experimental resultssupport predictability and potential use to improve phage therapy.

Biography:

Joon Ching Juan received his BSc in 2003 and PhD in 2007 from National University of Malaysia, Malaysia. Currently, he is an Associate Professor of Catalysis at Nanotechnology and Catalysis Research Centre, University of Malaya, Malaysia and also Senior Research Fellow (Adjunct) position at Monash University, Sunway Campus. Until now, he has managed to publish more than 100 publications, co-author four book chapters and his H-index is 20 (2017). He is the recipient of several awards including, Malaysia’s Research Star Award (2017) and National Young Scientist Award (2016).

Abstract:

There are still on-going debates on the role of carbon dioxide fi xation technologies on climate change. Nevertheless, we could not disregard the strong correlation between carbon dioxide concentration and global warming. Th is scenario has induced many researchers not only to reduce the carbon dioxide emission but also utilize or fi x carbon dioxide. Mainly two approaches
which are biological and chemical have been aggressively developed for carbon dioxide fi xation. Th e photoautotrophic cultivation of microalgae is the most promising biological method for carbon dioxide fi xation and utilization. Th is is because the microalgal biomass can be further processed as feedstock for biofuel and bio-based chemicals production. We have made used of microalgal technologies to be integrated into wastewater treatment such as in the palm oil mill effl uents. Meanwhile, the chemical pathways are: (i) utilization of carbon dioxide via catalytic conversion into fuel or chemical e.g., methanol and methane and (ii) fi xation of carbon dioxide into certain matrix such as cement. Recently, photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide into methanol has gained much interested because the process is less energy intensive. Defi nitely there are many new technologies being developed, but the feasibility of this technology on a large scale should be carefully evaluated. Th e biological and chemical perspectives on future of carbon dioxide fi xation and utilization are outlined.